Seite 1 von 2 12 LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 1 bis 10 von 14

Thema: Was ist ein Muffin?

  1. #1
    Registriert seit
    31.08.2006
    Beiträge
    2
    Renommee-Modifikator
    0

    Was ist ein Muffin?

    Guten Tag allerseits. Ich habe da ein Problem und hoffe, dass mit jemand von ihnen helfen kann, ich wäre sehr dankbar ! Ich studiere Lebensmittelwirtschaft und bin zur Zeit in meinem Praxissemester, welches ich in der Bagel Bakery mache. Für mein meinen Praktikumsbericht muss ich genaue Definitionen für die Produkte : Bagel, Muffin und Cookie angeben, doch damit habe ich so meine Problme, besonders was den Muffin angeht. Denn im Deutschen Lebensmittelrecht steht nichts brauchbares/genaues , im Internet habe ich auch nichts gefunden und an das US Amerikanische Lebensmittelrecht komme ich nicht ran. Es wäre sehr, sehr nett, wenn mir jemand in meiner Verzweiflung weiterhelfen könnte.

  2. #2
    Registriert seit
    29.01.2005
    Ort
    Toronto
    Alter
    59
    Beiträge
    267
    Renommee-Modifikator
    16

    AW: Was ist ein Muffin?

    hallo,

    wenn man will findet man alles im Internet
    Wikipedia gibt folgende Erklaerung:

    muffin
    The name muffin is given to two types of breadstuffs, one a yeast-leavened item, and the other a "quick" bread raised with baking powder or baking soda.

    In the United Kingdom, "muffin" refers to what is known in much of the English-speaking world as an English muffin. This yeast-raised muffin is the older of the two, appearing as a word in Britain around the 11th century A.D. Moufflet in Old French meant "soft" in reference to bread. (See English muffin for more information. For the purposes of this article, "muffin" will refer to what Britons call an American muffin.)

    The "quick" muffin is an American development from the 19th century, made possible by the invention of baking powder. This muffin is a thick, flat bun typically about 8 cm in diameter. In modern practice, it almost always has a "topping" baked in, such as blueberries or chocolate chips. It usually split into two, toasted and buttered, and bears a vague resemblance to a crumpet or pikelet.

    Fannie Merritt Farmer in her Boston Cooking-School Cook Book of 1896 gave recipes for both types of muffins, distinguishing one as "raised" and adding instructions for a version that is nearly identical to today's "English muffin". Here the raised-muffin mixture was cooked in muffin rings on a griddle, and flipped to brown both sides, producing a grilled muffin. Farmer indicated this was a useful method when baking in an oven was not practical. Boston Cookery-School Cook Book 1896

    The "quick" muffins may have started out as a form of small cake, or possibly an adaptation of cornbread. Early versions of these muffins tend to be less sweet and much less varied in ingredients than their contemporary forms. Made quickly and easily, they were useful as a breakfast food. They also rapidly grew stale, which prevented them from being a marketable baked good, and they were not seen much outside home kitchens until the mid-20th century. Recipes tended to be limited to different grains (corn, wheat bran, or oatmeal) and a few readily available additives (raisins, apples in some form, or nuts). Farmer listed 15 recipes of this type in 1896, of which there were two each of "one-egg", "berry", oat, graham flour, and rye; one with cornmeal, one with cooked rice, and the remaining three slightly enriched versions of the plain "one-egg" muffin.


    Muffins in the ovenWikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject:
    MuffinLook up muffin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Farmer used the term gem for her corn recipe, which was a muffin baked in a pan of lozenge shapes rather than circular cups. With the invention of circular muffin paper cups, hard-to-clean iron gem pans lost popularity, and are rarely used today, although corn muffins baked in the form of ears of corn remain a tradition. The development of non-stick pans has allowed the production of very elaborate muffin shapes (animals, holiday motifs, etc.), but the circular muffin remains the norm.

    In the 1950s, packaged muffin mixes were introduced by several American companies. By the 1960s, attempts were being made to treat the muffin like the doughnut as a franchise food business opportunity. Coffee shop-style restaurant chains appeared, featuring a wide variety of muffins. These tended to be regional, such as The Pewter Pot in southern New England. No such business has emerged nationally in the US (although doughnut chains have edged into the business), but Australia's Muffin Break has spread to New Zealand and the UK, featuring the American-style muffin.

    A somewhat odd combination of circumstances in the 1970s and 1980s led to significant changes in what had been a rather simple, if not prosaic, food. The decline in home-baking, the health food movement, the rise of the specialty food shop, and the gourmet coffee trend (exemplified by Starbucks) all contributed to the creation of what is now the standard contemporary muffin.

    Preservatives in muffin mixes led to the expectation that muffins did not have to go stale within hours of baking, but the resulting muffins were not a taste improvement over homemade. On the other hand, the baked muffin, even if from a mix, seemed almost good for one compared to the fat-laden alternatives of doughnuts and Danish pastry. "Healthful" muffin recipes using whole grains and such "natural" things as yoghurt and various vegetables evolved rapidly. But for "healthy" muffins to have any shelf-life without artificial preservatives, the sugar and fat content needed to be increased. The rising market for gourmet snacks to accompany gourmet coffees resulted in fancier concoctions in greater bulk than the original modestly-sized corn muffin. Today it is not unusual to find a muffin along the lines of "coconut-almond-cherry-chocolate" the size of a small baby's head.

    The marketing trend toward larger muffins also resulted in new muffin pan types for home-baking, not only for increased size. Since the area ratio of muffin top to muffin bottom changed considerably when the traditional small round exploded into a giant mushroom, consumers became more aware of the difference between the soft texture of tops, allowed to rise unfettered, and rougher, tougher bottoms, restricted by the pans. There was a brief foray into pans which could produce "all-top" muffins, i.e., extremely shallow, large-diameter cups. However, the reality of muffin physics prevented the fad from getting very far. The television program Seinfeld made reference to this in an episode in which the character Elaine attempted to start a bakery named "Top o' the Muffin" that sold only the muffin tops.


    Siegfried Heilemann

    Ich weiss dass ich nichts weis, nach einem Lied von Heinz Ruehmann

  3. #3
    Registriert seit
    16.07.2006
    Beiträge
    1
    Renommee-Modifikator
    0

    AW: Was ist ein Muffin?

    Hallo Lena
    Ein Muffin kommt soviel ich weiss aus USA.( Wie soviel) )) Der Muffin ansich ist ein Kleines Gebäckstück aus Rührteig und kann unterandem mit Rosienen oder schokoladenstückchen oder was auch immer du dir vorstellen kannst verührt und in kleine Formen gebacken. Wenn du immernoch keine Vorstellungen hats geh doch einfach mal in eine Bäckerei oder zum Supermarkt und lass Sie dir einafch zeigen.Oder schicke mir deine E-mail dann schicke ich Dir mal ein Foto.)))) Schmecken Klasse die Dinger. Im Supermakrt findest duu die bei den fertigbackmischungen ( Ekelig) z.b von Dr. Oetker
    Ich hoffe Dir geholfen zu haben

    Sperrwerk90
    Norbert
    norbert.richter33@freenet .de

  4. #4
    Registriert seit
    11.12.2006
    Ort
    Köln
    Alter
    41
    Beiträge
    8
    Renommee-Modifikator
    0

    AW: Was ist ein Muffin?

    Vieleicht findest du etwas unter" Rührteig " in den Lebensmittelbestimmungen. Wie der Vorschreber schon bemerkt hat ist es ein Rührteig.

    welche bestimmungen in den USA da gelten weiss ich auch nicht(wenns da welche überhaupt giebt) aber bei uns müsste das unter "Rührteig" fallen..und da solltest du was finden..ob diese bestimmungen etwas mit den Original Muffins aus Amerika zu tun haben weis ich nicht...die tun da von Magerine bis Öl alles rein (hab ich mal gehöhrt)

    und ob das bei einem "Rührteig" nach unseren bestimmungen zulässig ist weiss ich nicht ...Ich hab aber auch n Sandmasse fertig Produkt auf Arbeit,da kommt auch Speiseöl rein (Bähh) kann sein das das erlaubt ist.Kommt evtl auf die dosierung an..
    mfg Michi

  5. #5
    Registriert seit
    29.01.2005
    Ort
    Toronto
    Alter
    59
    Beiträge
    267
    Renommee-Modifikator
    16

    AW: Was ist ein Muffin?

    Ja lieber Michael, was der Bauer nicht kennt frisst er nicht........oder von Dingen die du nicht verstehst haelst du nichts........ Warum ist Oel "BAEhh" ? Deiner Aussage zu Folge muesste dann Margarine ok sein.....warum?

    du erwaehnst "Lebensmittelbestimmungen ".....sicher meinst du damit die

    "Leitsätze für Feine Backwaren"


    kleiner Tipp, lies Dich doch mal rein........ Da du sicherlich keine Zeit dazu hast hab ich Dir mal was zu Fetten hier reinkopiert

    Zitat Anfang: "Leitsätze für Feine Backwaren"

    Fette
    Fette im Sinne dieser Leitsätze sind Butter, Milchfetterzeugnisse1), Margarine- und Mischfetterzeugnisse2),
    Speisefette und Speiseöle sowie deren Zubereitungen. Soweit Fette gegenseitig
    ersetzt werden können, gelten für die in diesen Leitsätzen angegebenen Mindestzusätze
    an Fetten unter Berücksichtigung der unterschiedlichen Wassergehalte der
    verschiedenen Fettarten rechnerisch folgende Verhältnisse:
    10 kg Butter entsprechen 8,2 kg Butterreinfett, 8,2 kg Butterfett fraktioniert, 8,6 kg Butterfett,
    10,25 kg Margarine oder 8,2 kg anderer wasserfreier Fette.


    Zitat Ende


    Siegfried Heilemann

    Ich weiss dass ich nichts weis, nach einem Lied von Heinz Ruehmann

  6. #6
    Registriert seit
    11.12.2006
    Ort
    Köln
    Alter
    41
    Beiträge
    8
    Renommee-Modifikator
    0

    AW: Was ist ein Muffin?

    Nee..soo war das nicht gemeint..

    Ich meinte eigentlich das ich der Meinung bin( persöhnlich) Lieber eine "Richtige" sandmasse mit Butter herzustellen ,als so ein Vertigmix mit Speiseöl zu verwenden...aber das ist wohl geschmacksache.

    Und ich persöhnlich mag auch keine Magerine ... hab mich da wohl undeutlich ausgedrückt..?

    also nix für ungut..war ja auch nur ne vermutung,und mir war schon klar,das es hier jemanden giebt der sich mit diesen bestimmungen besser auskennt!

    und du hast recht..mir steht momentan echt nicht der sinn nach Verordnungen..geschweige denn mich da einzulesen deswegen Danke für die gedächtnissauffrischung. Hab ich auch mal gelernt..aber da ich "nur" Geselle bin, muss ich mich zum glück nicht soo sehr mit verordnungen beschäftigen..das machen bei un´s die Meister.(zum Glück)
    mfg Michi
    Geändert von Michael 1977 (13.12.2006 um 17:52 Uhr)

  7. #7
    Registriert seit
    25.02.2006
    Beiträge
    46
    Renommee-Modifikator
    0

    AW: Was ist ein Muffin?

    Hallo
    Ja lieber Siegfried, wenn die wuesten das Magariene eigentlich, einfach ausgedrueckt, dick gemachtes Oel mit Wasser ist, ja dann wuerden Sie ueber Oel ganz anders denken!
    Gruss Elli

  8. #8
    Registriert seit
    29.01.2005
    Ort
    Toronto
    Alter
    59
    Beiträge
    267
    Renommee-Modifikator
    16

    AW: Was ist ein Muffin?

    Die Meister bei denen werden das schon wissen..... und die Gesellen haben eh keine Ahnung bei denen


    Siegfried Heilemann

    Ich weiss dass ich nichts weis, nach einem Lied von Heinz Ruehmann

  9. #9
    Registriert seit
    11.12.2006
    Ort
    Köln
    Alter
    41
    Beiträge
    8
    Renommee-Modifikator
    0

    AW: Was ist ein Muffin?

    aber hast recht...

    (Mein Meister hat in dem Laden Gelernt und den Meister gemacht,hat nie wat anderes gesehn..) Zudem ist er assistenz der Geschäftsleitung und Backstubenleiter in einem...(Und macht noch 2 posten alleine nebenher,Kuvertüre und dekortorten..) Ist sowas eigentlich normal?

  10. #10
    Registriert seit
    29.01.2005
    Ort
    Toronto
    Alter
    59
    Beiträge
    267
    Renommee-Modifikator
    16

    AW: Was ist ein Muffin?

    kommt drauf an wie gross der Laden ist


    Siegfried Heilemann

    Ich weiss dass ich nichts weis, nach einem Lied von Heinz Ruehmann

Seite 1 von 2 12 LetzteLetzte

Aktive Benutzer

Aktive Benutzer

Aktive Benutzer in diesem Thema: 1 (Registrierte Benutzer: 0, Gäste: 1)

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Muffin nach dem Backen
    Von Meik70 im Forum Backwarenherstellung allgemein
    Antworten: 6
    Letzter Beitrag: 07.08.2009, 13:19
  2. Muffin
    Von elkenewbi im Forum Herstellung von Patisserie- Konditoreiwaren
    Antworten: 1
    Letzter Beitrag: 03.05.2007, 08:51

Berechtigungen

  • Neue Themen erstellen: Nein
  • Themen beantworten: Nein
  • Anhänge hochladen: Nein
  • Beiträge bearbeiten: Nein
  •